Essay on The Red Pony Written by John Steinbeck - Communication Among Generations

Essay on The Red Pony Written by John Steinbeck - Communication Among Generations

The communication among generations helps the process of succeeding in the future while not forgetting the past. Jody, the main character, looks up to his father, Billy Buck, a family friend, and Gitano, an old man who used to live on the Tiflin ranch. Jody wants to follow his father’s footsteps and own the family ranch and explore the Salinas Valley Mountains just like Gitano. Knowing the history in American can give ideas and ways to make the future a brighter place. Gitano teaches Jody the love and passion for nature. Jody names his horse, Gibalian, after the mountains Gitano explored. By focusing too much on the future, it’s easy to forget the past, the importance of childhood and what made a person they are today. When Jody gets his new horse, Gibalian, it changes his life and the gift challenges him to take charge of another creature. His usual work schedule slowly becomes no more as Jody forgets the past and becomes too focus in the future. When Jody meets Gitano, he forgets about Gibalian and he gets sick and dies. In The Red Pony, Steinbeck uses his own way of life to create the Tiflin’s lifestyle by lending a helpful hand and showing the importance of communication among generations.

For Romanticism, they reveled in nature and felt that civilization often corrupted man. They “sought to elevate imagination over reason and intuition over facts.” (A Literary Reference to His Life and Work, Jeffery Schultz and Luchen Li. p.178). To survive in nature, speed may occur, and so Jody imagined Gibalian was the fastest. This was when Steinbeck’s writings created imagination and life-like actions. Jody showed feelings toward his two red ponies, Gabilain and Nellie, like the Romantics did toward nature. He always wanted the best for them and when Gabilain got very sick, Jody’s emotions started running wild. Soon Gabilain died and that’s where the Romantics healing powers related to Jody because he overcame the sadness and had the courage to raise another red pony, Nellie. When Nellie then died, both horses were free to explore nature as the Romantics did. Steinbeck related his life to this when his friend, Ed, a marine biologist, died in a train wreck. He let himself free and wrote about anything. Most of Steinbeck’s stories can be related too because he only wrote about what was happening in his life. He noted that this story was written during a time of “desolation in my family.” (Encyclopedia, Coyici and Pascal Jr, p. 179).

Steinbeck applied it to experts to meet the threat of Nazi Germany. Since he wrote in the Romantic era, this had to do with the English Romanticism growing as a literary movement from 1798 to 1832. Steinbeck took the war for granted. During this time, farming and nature were popular to help victims in war. The downfall in Steinbeck’s writing also had aspects to the war. His goal was a direct vision of social cooperation. Many of his stories, novels, and plays had to do with the mood he was in at the time. Steinbeck took the war for granted so he wrote, “Bombs Away,” to tell the American people, “of the kind and quality of our air force, of the caliber of its men, and of the excellence of its equipment.” (Encyclopedia, Coyici and Pascal Jr, p. 176). Jody fought for Gabilain and Nellie’s life just like people fought in war.

By focusing too much on the future, it’s easy to forget the past, the importance of childhood and what made a person they are today. When Jody gets his new horse, Gibalian, he forgets to do his regular chores because he’s too excited and too busy taking care of Gibalian. The Romantics did everything they can to make life better and that’s what Jody wanted to do. When Jody meets Gitano, he forgets about Gabilain and Gabilain gets sick. Even though Jody and Billy Buck tried, Billy Buck’s expertise fails to save the life of the colt and Gabilain dies because he is left in the cold too long. At the very end, Nellie also dies of illness. “The deaths of the pony Gabilain and of the mare Nellie represent blood sacrifices that often accompany tribal initiation rites, and introduce Jody to the existence of death and evil in the world view which is his inheritance as an adult.” (A Literary Reference to His Life and Work, Jeffery Schultz and Luchen Li. p.182). When Jody meets Gitano, he forgets about his horses. When Steinbeck’s friend Ed died, he forgets about the importance of his own writings. The shock of Ed’s death affected his writings and impacted his life. This was when his writings became sad and mournful but he still kept writing just like Jody wanted another colt to challenge himself in succeeding again. “On a personal level for Steinbeck, the theme of death allowed him to lesson the burden of his helplessness as he watched his mother die and Ed becoming only but a memory. (Encyclopedia, Coyici and Pascal Jr, p. 177). This period was between 1948 and 1955, the period The Red Pony was taken place and was a period of revolution.

“Steinbeck’s scientific outlook made many problems for artists and contributed significantly to a negative response to much of his work by literary critics.” (Infotrac Literature Resource Center, p.14). The communication between the youngsters and elders is very important in life because the elders have more experience then the youngsters and can teach the children a lot more. In The Red Pony, Steinbeck gives strong advice and many helpful hints to life. It gives coming of age and the process of maturing and developing the right needs to becoming a good human being.