Paper on the Documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 by Michael Moore

Paper on the Documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 by Michael Moore

“Fahrenheit 9/11”, a documentary by Michael Moore, was an attempt to give people a graphic and horrifying look at the war on terror. It was mainly a thinly disguised anti-Bush campaign and an aid in the growing push to expel the President and his administration. Although Moore has remained neutral with his views, much of the footage in the documentary was more liberal at making people sympathize with those greatly affected by the war. Its title is a play on Ray Bradbury’s acclaimed novel Fahrenheit 451 which is about a future totalitarian state where reading, and thus independent thinking, has been outlawed. “Fahrenheit 451” takes its title from the temperature at which books burn. Moore has called "Fahrenheit 9/11” the "temperature at which freedom burns."

The forceful documentary gave a deep insight at the President of the United States. Moore uses humor and satirical content to exploit George Bush and make him the main victim of Moore’s wit. Audiences are compelled to laugh continually at the Bush’s stupidity and undeniable ability to be a public relations nightmare. Moore focused on the President’s first eight months in office. He said that Bush spent 42% of his time on vacation.
Archived video footage of a series of activities is revealed linking the Bush family to the Bin Laden family. Bush does have a relationship with Saudi Arabia that has led officials to overlook Saudi human-rights abuses and the support that many Saudis give to movements such as al Qaeda. What Moore fails to point out is that we've had a dirty relationship with the Saudis for a lot longer than the Bushes have been in politics. Concentrating on Bush family business connections ignores that history and encourages viewers to see the problem as specific to Bush. The film's most important revelation, the appearance of James R. Bath's name, has gone almost without comment on one of Bush's service records. Bath later functioned as the go-between linking the Bushes, the Bin Ladens, and the Saudis.

Another interesting point made by Michael Moore talked about in the second half of the movie. Anecdotal information about the war in Iraq is told by Mothers, soldiers, and average citizens describe their experiences. What this all means is that war is hell. This kind of information usually plays more on emotions and isn’t the most sound argument about a battle that’s bigger than a few stories. Grief itself doesn't make war wrong. Showing dead bodies doesn't get to the root of why this war is even more hell than any other. Finally, Michael Moore tries to accuse President Bush of poor housing in Flint, Michigan. “Roger and Me”, Moore’s previous documentary, discusses the same issue and that was before Bush was in office.

The problem with Moore's approach to “Fahrenheit 9/11” isn't what he presents, or even what he believes. It is just a piling on whatever he thinks is logical which harms any focused attack. The result is propaganda for people who already agree with him, but won't change the minds of anyone whose mind would want to change. The people who disagree will continue to disagree, because Moore does nothing to counter their arguments. “Fahrenheit 9/11” is a film worth watching, but not necessarily agreeing with. People shouldn’t see it and be forced to hold the beliefs of others or of Moore’s. They should see it only to gain enough knowledge to make up their own mind about President Bush, his administration, and Iraq.