Types of Differentiated Instruction

Types of Differentiated Instruction

According to Tomlinson & Kalbfleisch (1998) differentiated classrooms are "responsive to students’ varying readiness levels, varying interests, and varying learning profiles” (p. 54). Teachers focus on differentiating instruction to help motivate and interest students in learning. In the article DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION: INCLUSIVE STRATEGIES FOR STANDARDS-BASED LEARNING THAT BENEFIT THE WHOLE CLASS looked at a strategy that was used to help students with special needs and regular students achieve higher.
Types of differentiated instruction
In this article, differentiated instruction is used to hold students at a higher expectation and at a higher standard. Teachers use a variety of methods and support to help students learn in a challenging, but fun manner. For instance, the article mentioned using a 3-level planning pyramid that allows for accommodations and modifications. The bottom level would be additional support in a lesson, the middle section would be general curriculum, and the top of the pyramid would be enriched curriculum. The goal in this instruction is to cover the needs of students by having additional support in hand and having a visual of what/who will be challenged during the lesson. Each level has its own goal and each level will focus needs.
Appropriate usage
Teachers use strategies that work and fit student needs. The 3-level pyramid has to be understood before the teacher can carry out her lesson. For instance, in the additional support level, the teacher most know what students need extra support to understand the lesson and what student may need accommodations during the lesson. Students at this level are held at a different standard then the rest of the class. Students in the middle level are students who just came out of the additional support level such as, ELL students or students who are almost going to the next level, but have low motivation. The top of the pyramid is where students are help at a higher expectation with goals that allow modifications to the lesson in order to get students thinking at a higher level. A teacher most use the 3-level pyramid correctly in order for students to be able to move up, but to also know where students stand during a lesson. Each level is needed to be used in a proper manner for the strategy to work in the classroom.
Theories related to differentiated instruction
The theory behind this strategy is for the teacher to be effected on students learning. Delivering an effected lesson can help reduce errors and misunderstanding in subject content.
Conclusion
Differentiated instruction need to occur in every classroom and for every lesson. Teachers most take the time to prepare and modify a lesson to help students learn. The 3-level pyramid allows students to be challenged and held at a higher standard. As student’s needs are met, there is less of an opportunity for students to have any misunderstanding, students will be given clear instructions, and students will also build self-motivation and interest toward learning.

References
Lawrence B. (summer 2004). DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION: INCLUSIVE
STRATEGIES FOR STANDARDS-BASED LEARNING THAT BENEFIT THE
WHOLE CLASS. American Secondary Education 32(3).
Tomlinson, C., & Kalbfleisch, M.L. (1998, November). Teach me, teach my brain: A call for differentiated classrooms. Educational Leadership, 52-55.