The Food Industry - Who Controls it, Controls What We Eat

The Food Industry - Who Controls it, Controls What We Eat

The food industry is one of the biggest industries world-wide, and those who control it, control what we eat. We definitely are not aware to everything that goes on behind the scenes because big business executives go to every extent to keep what certain highly “efficient”, highly unnatural, techniques they use under wraps. Why? The answer is unclear, but put the facts together to form your own unique perspective. In the late 1800s and the early 1900s, the food industry was a very frightening scene. The health codes, non-existent by the way, were enough to make a person vomit. Now, we have more regulations about safety of our food, but really, haven’t we created more problems than we started with, and allowed the big food companies to become extremely powerful?

Their genetic engineering is efficient in conforming to the “more, more, more” attitude of America by creating bigger breasted chicken in a shorter time. This technique takes less genetically engineered chicken to make the same amount of meat out of healthy sized chickens. Not only is this scary because we are eating unnatural and curious chicken that may not be healthy for us, but the chickens are no longer real chickens able to live and do what chickens do freely. Their bodies cause them pain from the excess weight, and their organs are usually extremely damaged by such rapid growth and very many die as a result, but that doesn’t mean the rest are healthy. As Michael Pollan says, “When chickens live like chickens, they’ll taste like chickens, too.”
At the release of The Jungle, the public was shocked. The vulgar scenery painted by Upton Sinclair in The Jungle apparently had started to effect people in a way that Sinclair didn’t mean to. Attempting to gain the readers’ sympathy toward the horrific working conditions for workers, instead readers were more horrified at what they were eating and their own health as a result. Just as well, this response lead to great changes toward working conditions and the way food must be made. Sinclair’s response about how the public responded to his book was, “I aimed at the public’s heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.” (Cohen) Sinclair had hoped his book would spark the improvement of working conditions for the people who he dedicated The Jungle to.
The Jungle shared some awful details with its’ readers. These details included those such as the contents of sausages, such as how “It was only when the whole ham was spoiled that it came to the department of Elzbieta. Cut up by the two-thousand-revolutions-a-minute flyers and mixed with a half ton of other meat, no odor that ever was in a ham could make any difference.” (Sinclaire 132) Sinclair also shared how some, for no “special” reason would be marked “special”. “Some of it they would make into ‘smoked’ sausage, but as the smoking took time, and therefore was expensive. They would call upon their chemistry department and preserve it with borax and colour it with gelatin to make it brown. All of their sausage came out of the same bowl, but when they came to wrap it they would stamp some f it ‘special’ and for this, they would charge two cents more a pound.” The meat was spoiled half the time and contaminated with poison. “These rats were nuisances, and the packers would put poisoned br”

Because of the awful insight to the world of food industry and meat-packing, President Theodore Roosevelt was plagued by letters from the worried public. As a result of the hysteria and great public upset at the situations of the meat-packing industry displayed in The Jungle, the Food and Drug Act was instated. The FDA has the responsibility of, “protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs …our nation’s food supply …and by regulating the manufacture, marketing, and distribution of tobacco products.” (http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/CentersOffices/)

http://classiclit.about.com/cs/articles/a/aa_outofkilter_3.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/02/opinion/02tue4.html
don’t want the public to be scared of their products when their products have to be labeled as using cloned animals, and genetic engineering.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10632963

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidance... (FDA, maybeeee)

Works Cited
FDA.gov.
Food Inc. 2008.
Sinclaire, Upton. The Jungle. n.d.
USDA.gov.