Getting Over Nutritionism – Not Too Much: How To Eat

Getting Over Nutritionism – Not Too Much: How To Eat

French people tend to have better eating habits, because they control how much to eat and what foods are considered good to eat. Most Americans are likely to snack throughout the day and have a tendency to eat food or snacks in front of the TV, in the car, or while working on a computer. French people eat most of their meals with their family members instead of by themselves. A food culture includes “the set of manners, eating habits, and unspoken rules that together manage a people’s relationship to food and eating.” (182) French people eat foods with fewer calories, but know how to savor the taste over a period of time.

There are eight guidelines or ways to consider improving your eating habits as Americans. First, “Pay more but eat less”. (183) This principle implies that Americans are more concerned with quantity and price rather than the quality of the food. Your personal health will be improved by eating less of food, which is better quality but costs more. Some snack foods have many calories, but are cheaper and require little or no time to prepare. Second, “Eat meals.” (188) This point indicates that most Americans are not eating well balanced meals every day. In addition to the three traditional meals each day, some Americans tend to eat more food in front of the TV, in the car, or while working on a computer. When you eat at the dinner table with family members, you are likely to eat healthier meals which consist of fruits, vegetables, and dairy products.

The next three rules indicate where and when to eat the best quality foods. The third point is “Do all your eating at a table.” (192) In other words, you are not likely to eat good quality food when you are watching TV, on the computer, or when you are driving in your car. The fourth guideline is “Don’t get your fuel from the same place your car does.” (192) This point means that most foods sold at a gas station convenience store are not considered healthy. The fifth rule is “Try not to eat alone.” (192) Most people consume more food when they eat by themselves, instead of with family or friends. There is also a good possibility that some of these people eat unhealthy foods instead of well balanced meals.

The final three guidelines help people consider what types of healthy food to eat and how much of the food item to consume each day. The sixth point is “Consult your gut.” (193) “Most people allow external and mostly visual cues to determine how much we eat. The larger the portion, the more we eat; the bigger the container, the more we pour; the more conspicuous the vending machine, the more we buy from it; the closer the bowl of M&Ms, the more of them we eat.” (193) The traditions of food become a way of life through your sight. The seventh guideline is “Eat slowly.” (194) By eating in this manner, you are able to enjoy the taste of the food and recognize the quality instead of the quantity of your meals. The eighth rule is “Cook and, if you can, plant a garden.” (197) By following this plan, your meals will consist of healthier foods like fruits and vegetables. “The food you grow yourself is fresher and cheaper than produce from a grocery store.” (198) Eating healthy well balanced meals should be the most important part of your lifestyle. Let us prove to the world that Americans can eat healthy meals just like the French.